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Total Eclipse of the Basin

About the Basin, August 18, 2017

If you were not lucky enough to book a spot on the Royal Caribbean’s Total Eclipse Cruise to watch Bonnie Tyler belt Total Eclipse of the Heart at the moment the moon blacks out the sun in Monday’s solar eclipse, there are plenty of local eclipse celebrations to choose from.

Plan on taking a selfie with the moon? You know looking directly at the sun during an eclipse can create irreparable eye damage, but it could damage your phone as well. You might want to use those solar glasses for your phone’s camera and check out NASA’s guidelines for safely photographing the eclipse.

In the Potomac River basin, the moon will start to show a shadow around 1:00pm, peak between 2:00-3:00pm and be over by 4:00. Exact timing depends on your specific location. Many state and national parks are holding special events to commemorate the occasion. Here are some of the events going on around the Potomac River basin.

Virginia:

Many Virginia State Parks, including Caledon State Park, are holding special activities to learn more about the science behind solar eclipses and providing a limited number of commemorative solar eclipse glasses. They invite the public to bring a lawn chair or picnic blanket to enjoy the astronomical show.

For a real adventure, head out on the Potomac River for a Solar Eclipse Kayak Tour at Algonkian Regional Park in Sterling, Va.

Maryland:

“Dark Sky” parks are areas with little light pollution and are ideal of eclipse viewing. Point Lookout Park, where the Potomac River meets the Chesapeake Bay, is one such park. Although they are not holding a special event, it would be a great place to watch eclipse.

Rocky Gap State Park is offering a hike, a hula hoop workshop, and yoga class in celebration of the solar eclipse.

Rockville Science Center and Gaithersburg Community Museum are hosting a free, fun viewing party at Observatory Park. Science projects, free solar viewers, and hands-on activities are planned.

Many more fun events are planned in the area. Check out your local park, museum or college for other viewing parties!

 

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Leesylvania State Park

About the Basin, August 11, 2017

Located along the Potomac River in Prince William’s County, Virginia, Leesylvania State Park has a lot to offer its multitude of visitors. As one online reviewer states, “This gem of a park offers peace and quiet in the middle of the hubbub of NoVA.” Although small, the park offers a range of amenities for those looking to escape the city for a day, including trails, a boat ramp into the Potomac River, visitor’s center, picnic shelters with barbecues, fishing spots, a playground, and more.

(c) Flickr, Mrs.Gemstone, “Leesylvania State Park – PotomacBeach”

A Living Shoreline project is currently in progress at the park to prevent erosion and create a habitat for aquatic plants and animals. This type of restoration project builds up the shoreline using natural materials to create a wetland environment that protects the shore from erosion and provides valuable habitat. There is an informational walk open to the public on September 10 to learn more about the project and the ecological principles behind it.

Having only been open since 1992, the park itself is relatively young. However, the area is full of history, with some spots within the park listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The land was once owned by some of the more famous residents of northern Virginia, the Lee and Fairfax families. Chimneys are all that remain of these notable residences though. A few members are buried in a cemetery within the park. These historic sites are accessible by trail. Learn more about the wartime history of the area on the Potomac River Blockade Boat Tours in September and October.

In addition to the events above, the staff at Leesylvania State Park provide weekly events for people of all ages. Walks, talks, and other adventures explore the wildlife of the area, from the bottom of the ponds to the sky above. If you can’t make it to a scheduled event, park staff are usually on hand to discuss wildlife, fishing spots, or history of the park.

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ICPRB Business Meeting Announcement

The 4th Quarter ICPRB Business Meeting will be held August 29th, 2017 at the ICPRB office in Rockville, Md. The public is invited to attend, but please RSVP as space is limited. The ICPRB Commissioners will be updated on the ongoing Basin-Wide Comprehensive Water Resources Plan. Commissioners also will be briefed on ICPRB efforts to create new water quality assessment tools and the MWCOG Water Supply Resiliency Study.

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Greenbrier State Park

About the Basin, August 4, 2017

Photo Credit: Flickr, dpbirds, “Sunset, lake and hills !!”

Celebrating its 50th year, Greenbrier State Park has not changed much since the doors opened in 1967. Barring the additional bathroom or two, the long, sandy beach and 42-acre man-made lake ringed by beautiful forest looks much the same as it did back when it’s visitors wore bell-bottoms. The area still provides fun and adventure for both local and traveling families.

Along with Gathland, Washington Monument, and South Mountain, Greenbrier is one of four connected state parks known as the South Mountain Recreation Area, located between Frederick and Hagerstown in western Maryland. There is something for everyone in this neck of the woods, fishing, wildlife, swimming, boating, camping, picnicking, hunting, and even a visitor’s center to tell you all about it. If that’s not enough, the Appalachian Trail runs through the park as well.

You can rent a boat to spend an afternoon on the lake fishing for trout, largemouth bass or bluegill, rent a gazebo with friends for a casual, lakeside get together, or just park your chair in the sand to enjoy the sights and sounds of nature while enjoying the cool feel of water on your toes.

The park was as popular back in 1967 as it is now (the budget had to be doubled shortly after opening to accommodate for the underestimated number of visitors).

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McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management Area is at Full Bloom

Family taking photos among a field of sunflowers.

You might think field upon field of bright yellow sunflowers are found only in provincial Italy or France, places known for romance and beauty. But there are 2,000 acres right in our backyard that will make you feel transported to a more romantic time and place. Known as the McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management Area (WMA), staff at this park plant acres of sunflowers to attract and feed pollinators and birds. For a couple weeks each year (around the end of July) the WMA is alight with seemingly endless summery flowers.

Just like birds, people flock to the area for family photos, nature photography, and to enjoy the sites. Catch the flowers at full bloom this year for the two weeks following July 24. Meandering trails throughout the fields let you explore without damaging the flowers. However, look but don’t pick; plucking one of these beauties is prohibited at the WMA.

Flowers at McKee-Bashers Wildlife Management AreaWhen sunflowers aren’t the main attraction, there are plenty of trails to hike or bike in the area. Since they are connected to the C&O Canal trail system, the WMA trails makes for a nice side trip or starting point on the Canal. Hunting  waterfowl, deer, wild turkey and other animals is allowed (within the usual hunting regulations). There is even a specially managed dove field open to the public for hunting. Birding and wildlife photography are popular activities at the WMA due to the abundance of wildlife, including 200 species of songbirds found in the area. The more adventurous can take a boat across the Potomac to reach Maddux Island, which is part of the WMA.

A beautiful trail follows some of the perennial marshy flatlands where waterlilies and other aquatic plants abound. Parts of the WMA are managed as a greentree reservoir, a term used for bottomland hardwood forest that is flooded in the fall and winter. This attracts colorful migrating waterfowl, such as wood ducks.

The park, in western Montgomery County, Maryland, is conveniently located right off River Road. It is not difficult to find, just plug “McKee Banshee Management Area” into your GPS and look for the parking lots full of cars and people in incongruously fancy dress for a hike. After all, this is a popular place to take family photos. This map shows parking areas and the location of sunflower fields. There are several ways to access the fields, but most involve a short walk through the woods that is often muddy, so make sure to wear appropriate footwear.

Photo Credit: Hunter Herrman

 

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Seneca Creek State Park

About the Basin, July 21

The Seneca Creek State Park runs the length of Seneca Creek from Route 355 until it empties into the Potomac River. It is unique gem in Montgomery County, Maryland. At 6,300-acres, the park covers a lot of ground, allowing for a wide variety of recreational opportunities.

A boathouse on a lake

Credit: Flickr, Mr.TinDC, Clopper Lake Boat Center

Many of the park activities are centered around a 90-acre body of water called Clopper Lake. Boat rentals, picnic pavilions, playgrounds, and trails surround the lake. Hiking, biking, kayaking, boating (electric motors only), fishing, and hunting are popular activities. A 32-acre Disc Golf course at the park has 36 holes and positive reviews online.

For those brave enough, the Seneca Creek Greenway Trail runs 16.5-miles from the northeastern edge of the park to the southwestern edge, where Seneca Creek meets the Potomac River. There are plenty of other trails for the less intrepid, including the 3.4-mile Lake Shore Trail that takes you around the lake. Schaeffer Farm Area is especially popular with mountain bikers. An online trail map provides trail options and parking lot locations.

Historical features of the park include the Seneca Schoolhouse, a one-room historic schoolhouse built in 1865 of red Seneca Sandstone. The Black Rock Mill, an old mill, has some mill equipment on display.

The park has a popular winter lights display that opens Thanksgiving weekend where you can take your family on a slow 3.5-mile drive through 350 holiday light displays.

Park staff has a packed calendar of fun activities this summer, including pontoon boat rides, fishing lessons, nature walks, and a kid’s program called “Nature Shack”. Kayaks and canoes are available for rent ($28-40/4 hours) from the boat center. You can also join the outdoor store, REI, on July 29, 2017 for their Learn to Kayak Class ($70) for a perfect excuse to spend some time on the water and learn a new skill.

A boathouse on a lake

Credit: Flickr, Mr.TinDC, Clopper Lake Panorama

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Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens

About the Basin, July 14

Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens is not your typical national park. “Strikingly beautiful” as one Yelp reviewer called it, it is the only national park solely dedicated to growing

aquatic plants for your viewing pleasure.  And they are really good at it. Located in northeast Washington, D.C., along the Anacostia River, it is known as one of the premier sites for engagement, wedding, baby photoshoots. The colorful aquatic flowers abound throughout the gardens, especially during late June and July when the lotus and lily flowers are in full bloom.

A pond with aquatic flowers next to a walking path.

Credit: Flickr NPS CulturalLandscapes Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens

The aquatic gardens are mainly marshland with many walking paths and boardwalks to enjoy. Pack a picnic to enjoy on one of the many shaded benches or bring a blanket to dine in true picnic-fashion next door at Kenilworth Park. Turtles, beavers, swans, muskrats and a wide variety of other wildlife can be spotted swimming or flying among the flowers. But don’t forget your bug spray!

Summer hours are 9:00am-5:00pm, but it is suggested to get there early as some of the flowers close up due to the summer heat. Many of the trails at the aquatic gardens are wheelchair accessible (but not paved, so it may be muddy after a rain). Wheelchairs are available at the visitor’s center. Want to paddle around the marsh? Head up to Bladensburg Waterfront Park to rent a kayak ($20/day), then paddle the short trip down the Anacostia River to Kenilworth park for an adventurous float through the tidal marshes and water trails. Start out a couple hours before high-tide so you don’t get stranded in the mud.

Enjoy Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens in its glory during the upcoming weeklong Lotus and Water Lilly Festival that kicks off on July 15, 2017. Dance performances, food, demonstrations, arts and crafts, and more will celebrate these exotic flowers. Anacostia Watershed Society is also organizing a free canoe trip through Kenilworth Park on the evening of Thursday, July 20.

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Blockhouse Point Park

About the Basin, July 7, 2017

Blockhouse Point Park is a little-known park that played a large part in history. The park is just north of Great Falls in the western part of Montgomery County on the Maryland side of the Potomac River. To keep an eye on the Confederate troops across the river, Union soldiers used it as a camp and lookout. From high vistas, the C&O Canal and Potomac crossings could be watched closely to prevent enemy raids. Three blockhouses (hence the name) were used as observation points by the Union army. They were eventually burned down by the Confederate troops in 1864. The land was used post-war to search for the Lincoln assassination co-conspirators and to look for Confederate soldiers returning to Maryland because of the excellent views of the Potomac River and its surrounding areas.

Google Map of Blockhouse Point Park

Today, the 630-acre park is used by hikers, bikers, and equestrians. Considered by Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission Department of Parks as one of the Best Natural Areas, it is a microcosm of landscapes with mature upland forest, floodplain forest, palustrine wetlands, streams, river-rock outcrops, and more. It is also home to at least nine species of threatened, endangered, or watchlist plants.

There are 7+ miles of natural surface trails. Much of the trails are designated for hikers only, but there are some “hiker/equestrian” trails and some “shared use” trails. The sole biking trail is the Muddy Branch Greenway Trail that originates in North Potomac, follows the edge of the park, then connects to the C&O Canal Towpath. Two small parking lots are located on the south side of River Road.

A map and a brochure about the park provide more information for visitors. On July 15, 2017, Join the C&O Canal Association on a float down the section of the canal that runs through the park. Paddlers will enjoy a trip down the canal from Violette’s Lock just north of Blockhouse Point Park, down to Great Falls. Learn about this event and other fun happenings in the Potomac River basin on ICPRB’s Calendar of Events.

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Path Through Paw Paw

About the Basin, June 30, 2017

Located in western Maryland along the border of West Virginia, the Paw Paw tunnel started out as a way for the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal to bypass 6 miles of horseshoe-shaped bends in the North Branch of the Potomac River. A seemingly simple task, it was expected to take 2 years to complete. The first boat floated through the tunnel in 1850, fourteen years later.

Only a few short miles down the river the C&O Canal ends in Cumberland, Md., instead of the originally planned stopping point of Pittsburgh, Pa., partly due to the expense of Paw Paw tunnel. What could go wrong did go wrong during the construction of the tunnel. Engineering problems, worker riots, financial issues and more plagued the contractors.

Entrance to Paw Paw Tunnel

Credit: Flickr, Nicolas Raymond, Paw Paw Tunnel – HDR

As the saying goes, one man’s trash (or waste of time and money) is another man’s treasure, and this tunnel is a treasure. At 3,118-feet long, it can be enjoyed on foot or by bike, although it is recommended to walk your bike through the tunnel. It is a fun and adventurous look at history, just don’t forget your flashlight (a cell phone flashlight with plenty of battery life would work as well). The trek starts with a .5-mile hike from Paw Paw Tunnel Campground to the entrance of the tunnel. After admiring the archway, breathe in the cool, moist air of the tunnel. A fun walk through the tunnel brings you to a small waterfall on the other end. Once you’ve braved the full length of the tunnel, head back via the 2-mile long Tunnel Hill Trail that goes above the tunnel and includes interpretive signage.

A boat ramp in Paw Paw, W. Va. allows access to those horseshoe-bends in the Potomac River that provide stunning views. Looking for a longer adventure? Enjoy some kayak-camping while you paddle down the twists and turns of the Paw Paw Bends enjoying the rocky gorge. The National Park Service has an example itinerary of a 3-day kayak tour of the area. Don’t feel like going it alone? Join the Potomac Riverkeeper Network’s Paw Paw Bends Float and Camping trip coming up July 15-16.

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Mallow’s Bay, the Graveyard Teeming with Life

About the Basin, June 23, 2017

Kayak at Mallows Bay

Kayak alongside a sunken ship at Mallow’s Bay

On the Maryland side of the Potomac, just south of Washington, D.C., sits Mallow’s Bay. It has made news recently for being a controversial nominee for a National Marine Sanctuary designation by NOAA. The initial application included over 70 letters of recommendation from conservation organizations, historical societies, museums, federal agencies, elected officials and more. Controversial or not, there is a reason so many organizations found this spot to be a treasure of the Potomac River. Mallow’s Bay is the final resting place for almost 200 boats that cover two centuries of history. Paddleboarders and kayakers alike feel a sense of magic while floating through the water, knowing that at any given time they are only inches from rich history. As the largest concentration of shipwrecks in the Western Hemisphere, there is nary a spot in the bay where there is not a ship decaying on the floor below. These salvaged, and then sunk, ships are now home to a wide variety of fish, crustaceans, and aquatic vegetation. Some ships have created islands where osprey nest and crabs skitter across the sand.

Blue Crab at Mallows Bay

Blue Crab at Mallow’s Bay

The next few years will most likely see many changes for Mallow’s Bay. Possible plans for the area include paddle-in campsites, hiking trails, interpretative signage and additional public access amenities. Designation as a National Marine Sanctuary will only increase the speed and intensity of the additions and the public exposure it receives. These changes will bring their own benefits, but in the meantime, now is a great time to visit this primitive and isolated area. Take advantage of the quiet, meditative bay with the beautiful, sunken boats. Final decision on the National Marine Sanctuary designation is expected in one to two years.

As part of REI’s summer of fun events, the outdoor store will host a guided tour of Mallow’s Bay and the “Ghosts of the Potomac” on July 5th, which includes transportation from the D.C. metro area. Learn about this event and many others in the Potomac River basin on our Calendar of Events.